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Amazon targets the 'flikers'

Global e-tailing giant Amazon has taken a step towards reducing the number of misleading or fake reviews on its website (a practice referred to as ‘fliking’) by placing a limit on the number of reviews an individual can leave. Although the limit is not enforced for buyers of products from the site, individuals can now only leave five reviews for items they have not bought.

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New York takes a stand against unauthorized ticket resellers

At 10.29pm EST on Monday 28th November 2016, the fight against the illegal resale of tickets in New York State took a new direction when Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill that criminalizes the use of ‘ticket bots’. Ticket bots are machines that run scripts on ticketing websites that can complete transactions faster than a human can, and thus capture tickets for popular events almost instantaneously. For anyone left scratching their head, empty handed after failing to secure just-released tickets for sporting events, theatre shows or concerts – ticket bots are the reason.

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A ticket to ride?

We’ve discussed the issues surrounding counterfeit tickets in a number of previous articles, as well as how technology has facilitated the ease with which they can be passed to legitimate buyers without their knowledge until they’re refused entry into events.

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2017 – the year of…?

Rolling towards the end of November and into the almost daily updates to the kids’ Christmas lists, it’s that time when we start to look ahead to next year and think about the changes that we might expect to see over those 12 months.

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Five tips to ensure that you stay one step ahead of the Black Friday and Cyber Monday madness

Despite their origins across the Atlantic, Black Friday and Cyber Monday are now as big a part of the UK’s digital economy as they are in the United States. A few UK retail stores use Black Friday to kick off their Christmas offers, but it certainly doesn’t have the same level of traction in the high streets and shopping centers as it does in America. However, online it’s a different matter.

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Zuckerberg, we have a problem

For those of us who have been around social media for a while, we’ve learnt to take the content published with a pinch of salt. Whether it’s the incessant “you will never believe what she did next” buzzfeed-type stories, the ‘looks too good to be true’ discount vouchers or counterfeit goods, or the recently discovered videos proving that the Loch Ness monster is real, the aim remains the same − to drive traffic to external websites where more nefarious activities can be actioned by cyber-criminals.

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Common ale-ments

Earlier this week at the INTA Leadership conference in Fort Lauderdale, there was a very interesting session on the growth in craft brewing and how it has affected the management of intellectual property disputes. I say interesting as there was free beer on offer...

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Is the thrill of buying counterfeits fueling the problem of IP abuse?

Three years ago, consultancy firm PwC published a ground-breaking report into the attitudes of consumers towards counterfeit goods. It was the first survey for many years that focused on why people bought or consumed fake items; the results were both enlightening and worrying.

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Amazon sues: taking the fight to counterfeiters

This week has seen big news in the anti-counterfeiting arena, as Amazon has filed two lawsuits against sellers allegedly selling counterfeit items through its online marketplace.

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A dotBrand full of beans

The new gTLD program could be described as a ‘slow burner’ in terms of changing the way we register, market and search for domain names. I’m not alone in hoping that we would have seen a big (dot) bang when the program started in earnest three years ago. Instead we've seen plenty of registration activity but only a small percentage of new gTLDs being actively used.

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One weird trick to steal your money

On this year’s World Diabetes Day1, it is sobering to reflect on the recent, depressing predictions by Public Health England concerning the disease. The organization released a forecast stating that the number of people with the disease could top five million if obesity rates continue to increase, with one in ten adults in the UK being at risk of developing diabetes by 2035. This would mean that £1 of every £6 spent by the NHS would be allocated to providing care for diabetes patients2.

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Using TTL to mitigate the impact of DNS interruption

There’s not a week goes by when we don’t hear of another attempted, or successful, cyber-attack. In the past few days, we’ve seen a UK bank admit that around 20,000 customers were affected by an intrusion over the weekend, which represents a new level in the cyber-attacks leveled at the financial sector.

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Trumping the domain name world

As luck would have it I arrived in New York last night in time to watch the US Presidential Election results unfold. Between 10pm and 1am EST the vote was too close to call but in the next hour or so Donald Trump’s lead started to become clear and by 3am he was announced the 45th President of the United States of America. So how did the ebb and flow of the last few days of campaigning and the events of last night impact domain name registrations featuring the keywords 'Trump' and 'Clinton'?

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The social presidency

Today, the fight for the White House will be resolved after the most controversial and divisive political campaigns ever. Both candidates have tried to engage voters of all ages, using social media and online campaigns extensively to try to increase the number of people who will cast their vote, which has traditionally been around 54% of the electorate.

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The next American President needs to understand the world wide web and its threats

The US economy loses around $100 billion from cybercrime each year, which represents almost 200,000 lost jobs and is almost half of the total loss for the G-8 group of Western countries. Over the years, we have seen major US brands suffer a range of attacks, including DNS hijacking, personal data breaches, server breaches and a growing trend of hacking social media accounts.

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Fully loaded and ready to infringe

From the analog days of cassette tapes and VHS, to the Internet age of Peer2Peer and streaming, piracy has grown to become more sophisticated and, now, more readily available to a much wider audience. As Internet speeds have developed from dial-up to broadband, and technology has advanced, Internet piracy has quickly become a big threat to the TV and film industry.

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Balancing a robust defense with an exciting attack in the domain name world

I’m a keen team-sports fan, and although the clubs I hold an affection for do not always win, I know it is not always about the result. OK – I admit I have an uncanny habit of backing teams that lose more than they win, but that enables me to gain a perspective on what actually makes a good team.

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2016 – the year of online fraud?

An unconvincing, typo-ridden email purporting to be from a well-known brand is now unfortunately a far too common sight in our inboxes and something that, hopefully, we have learnt not to engage with. The renowned spam email is, however, now just one of several threats targeting our financial details.

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The new gTLD program introspective

After two and a half years of almost weekly excitement and anticipation, the new gTLD program feels like it has stalled. We knew there would come a point when all the new gTLDs that could easily launch would have launched and the only ones left would be those in contention or with issues to resolve − and that’s where we appear to be today.

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A cover-to-cover look at e-book piracy

Today, 1st November, not only marks the start of a new calendar month, it is also World Authors Day, a day during which the literary community celebrates authors and the books they write. Piracy remains an ongoing problem within the publishing industry as more users start to read books on their tablets and e-readers, some even circumventing paying for the books and opting to download them for free.

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